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How to Kill Ground Ivy (Creeping Charlie) in Your Lawn

I have had great success killing lawn weeds like Ground Ivy in fall. As long as your daily temps are reaching a high of 50 to 60 degrees or more the day you spray, you can kill pesky perennial weeds like Dandelion, Clover and Ground Ivy (Creeping Charlie), as well as annual weeds like Chickweed and Henbit.  Kill them this fall and they will not be in your lawn next spring.

Fall is a great time of year to kill Ground Ivy (also known as Creeping Charlie).

Fall is a great time of year to kill Ground Ivy (also known as Creeping Charlie).  Click photo to enlarge

There are various Ortho Weed-B-Gon products depending on where you live. Click here to see your options.  I have had great success killing Ground Ivy and Wild Violets with Ortho Weed-B-Gon Chickweed, Clover & Oxalis Killer.

If you need to feed your lawn you could go with Scotts Turf Builder WinterGuard plus 2 Fall Weed & Feed.  It does a pretty good job on clover, chickweed and ground ivy this time of year, however if you also have Wild Violets and Oxalis you should go with the Weed-B-Gon.

Note: If you planted grass seed this fall, it is best to wait until the new seedlings have been mowed 4 times before you apply weed killers.

Last Call for Garlic

If you are like Rita and I you are always looking for something else to plant in your vegetable garden. A vegetable that you can plant now for harvest next year is garlic but you need to hurry to allow enough time for roots to form before the soil gets too cold.  Here is a link to one of the many garlic sources where we have found many great varieties:  Click here to visit the Territorial Seed site where you will find over 30 varieties of garlic.

Garlic we harvested in summer that we planted the previous fall.

Garlic we harvested in summer that we planted the previous fall.  (Click photo to enlarge)

Listen-in To Garden Radio September 27

This Saturday morning around 8:00 am EDT, I will be a guest on my friend Tom MacCubbin’s Florida “Better Lawns and Garden” Radio Show. (Click here to open his radio show website where you will be able to listen in.)

Former Cooperative Extension Agents Tom MacCubbin and Ashton Ritchie enjoy swapping gardening advice.

Former Cooperative Extension Agents Tom MacCubbin and Ashton Ritchie enjoy swapping gardening advice.

Listen in to Garden Radio Shows Sept 20 & 21

This Saturday morning around 8:00 am EDT I will be on The Magic Garden radio show with my good friend Mort White.   Click here to open the show website where you will be able to listen in.

Mort White and I have been friends for many years.  I always look forward to being a guest on his Magic Garden Radio Show.

Mort White and I have been friends for many years. I always look forward to being a guest on his Magic Garden Radio Show.

Also this weekend I will be on the Real Estate Today Radio Show with Gil Gross. Click here to find out how you can listen in as times vary by city.

Thanks to Gil Gross for inviting me to be a return guest on his radio show.

Thanks to Gil Gross for inviting me to be a return guest on his radio show.

Fall Grass Seeding Tips

These are my six tips for planting grass seed this fall:

  1. Cheap seed will give you problems down the road.  Scotts Turf Builder Grass Seed blends are sold for different lawn situations using the best available grass varieties.  Old seed that has been stored in a garage causing it to experience big temperature changes will germinate poorly. It is best to buy fresh seed and use it all that season.
  2. Rough up the top inch or so of your soil.  The idea is to make sure the seed is in good contact with soil and that it is no deeper than the top 1/8 inch. If you are seeding into an existing lawn, a slit-seeder can be rented to help the seed come in contact with the soil without damaging your grass.  If you do not use a slit-seeder, you can expect some of the grass seed to find its way to the soil and live after germination, however a good bit of the seed will sprout without finding soil for the roots to spread before drying out.
  3. After you spread the seed, feed with Scotts Starter Lawn Food, and then make one pass across the newly seeded area with an upside down leaf rake (tines pointed up). Note: this is a leaf rake, not a garden rake. . It is ok to still see some seed on the surface.
  4. Keep your new seed moist until your new grass is established. Fall seeding germinates faster than spring planted grass because the soil is warmer. With colder spring soil you can sometimes count on 2 weeks or more before you see new grass spouts. In fall this time can be cut down to 7 to 14 days. Also understand that no matter when you seed, you will generally see some of the grass seed come up a week or so before the rest of your seed germinates because of the different varieties in the seed blend and their different germination times. This is why it is important to keep up your watering a week or so after you begin to seed new seedlings.  If you suspect you will have a difficult time keeping the soil moist, a thin layer of straw can be spread over the seed.
  5. Anytime you use a weed killer and plan to seed, check the label to see what the waiting period is before you can plant grass seed or how long you need to wait to kill weeds after seeding.
  6. A feeding of Scotts Turf Builder one month after seeding will also help your new grass fill-in thin areas.

Our Deck Planters: 200 Peppers and Counting

After the last of our spring harvest from our deck planters (kale, spinach, lettuce, swiss chard) we planted 9 pepper plants on April 30.  These three planters have 3 – Gypsy Hybrid and 6 – Carmen Hybrid peppers.  These self-watering planters hold about 4 gallons of water.  The soil is Miracle-Gro Moisture Control Potting Mix.  We have found it is best to start with fresh soil each year and clean the roots out of the water reservoir.  We fed the plants with Osmocote when we planted them.

Here are the photos so you can check out the progress.

We planted 3 pepper plants in each planter on April 30 (click photo to enlarge)

We planted 3 pepper plants in each planter on April 30 (click photo to enlarge)

We use small cages to help keep the plants stable with the extra weight of the peppers (click photo to enlarge)

We use small cages to help keep the plants stable with the extra weight of the peppers.  This photo was taken June 25.  (click photo to enlarge)

Each planter has a Gypsy pepper plant is in the center and Carmen peppers are on the ends. There are still tons of green peppers on the plants that we will wait to pick after they turn orange and red to get maximum sweetness. (Click photo to enlarge)

Each planter has a Gypsy pepper plant is in the center and Carmen peppers are on the ends. There are still tons of green peppers on the plants that we will wait to pick after they turn orange and red to get maximum sweetness. (Click photo to enlarge)

Listen in to Garden Radio Sept 13

I will be with my good friend “The Georgia Gardener” Walter Reeves as a guest on his Radio Show Saturday, September 13 from 8:00 am until 9:00 am EDT.  Click here to open the WSB website where you will be able to listen in.

Click here to check out Walter’s “Georgia Gardener” website.

Former Extension Agents Walter Reeves and Ashton Ritchie hanging out at Walter’s WSB radio show studio in Atlanta

Former Extension Agents Walter Reeves and Ashton Ritchie hanging out at Walter’s WSB radio show studio in Atlanta

 

 

 

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