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Listen in to Garden Radio Shows Sept 21 & 22

September 18, 2013

This Saturday morning around 8:00 am EDT I will be on The Magic Garden radio show with my good friend Mort White.    Click here to open the show website where you will be able to listen in.

Mort White and I have been friends for many years.  I always look forward to being a guest on his Magic Garden Radio Show.

Mort White and I have been friends for many years. I always look forward to being a guest on his Magic Garden Radio Show.

Also this weekend I will be on the Real Estate Today Radio Show with Gil Gross.  Click here to find out how you can listen in as times vary by city.

Thanks to Gil Gross for inviting me to be a return guest on his radio show.

Thanks to Gil Gross for inviting me to be a return guest on his radio show.

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6 Comments
  1. Tonya Johannemann permalink

    I live in Northern Kentucky, have had very wet spring and early summer that has resulted in widespread fungus. Not sure which type. Small clusters of darker green/blue grass that appears thinner. Seems to spread like wildfire. Results in brown patches where crowns and roots are destroyed. Tried treating several times with Scotts fungicide. Recently fertilized since it is mid sept. Seems to have worsened. I mow frequently – trying to keep it higher. I bag and remove clippings. What do I do now? How can I prevent for next year – my yard is about 1 1/2 acres so costs are starting to mount up. I only water early morning with irrigation. none of my neighbors seem to have this and they do nothing to their lawns. Very frustrating!

    • Hi Tonya
      Sorry about all your lawn problems. You live in an area that during late spring/summer experiences both lawn fungus problems from high temps and humidity as well as insect and grub problems. Your description of the different type of grass in not enough for me to ID what it is and the problem. My first thought is that it could be Bentgrass, which forms patches that get larger each year. The texture is fine and this grass is more prone to disease and insect problems than other grasses. The Fescues are generally the best choice for your area. Scotts Heat-Tolerant Blue has been a good choice for many folks with growing conditions like yours. These grass blends are less prone to fungus and insect problems. They also benefit from two or three fall feedings.

      • Johannemann, Tonya permalink

        I have fine lawn (elite). So, moving forward… will these fungus be dormant until next spring and start all over again? I can put down scotts fungicide in spring but I want to obviously kill it vs treat. Is it possible to stop it in its tracks next spring?

        Tonya Johannemann MSN, RN, NE-BC Director of Perinatal Services
        Office 513 862 3602 | Pager 513 819 5237 | Fax 513 862 2861
        Tonya_Johannemann@trihealth.com
        Good Samaritan Hospital
        375 Dixmyth Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45220
        TriHealth.com | 513 862-1400
        [http://www.trihealth.com/images/logo-email-sig.png]
        [Magnet 100px]

      • Hi Tonya
        If you know you have grass varieties that are prone to lawn disease (fungus), lawn fungicides are best applied just as the temp and humidity is optimum, not too far in advance. Even though the fungi may be in your soil/lawn it does not really help to treat when they are dormant.

      • Johannemann, Tonya permalink

        So what gets rid of it – will it be dormant forever and I will have to treat every year (since we do have humidity each year)?

        Tonya Johannemann MSN, RN, NE-BC Director of Perinatal Services
        Office 513 862 3602 | Pager 513 819 5237 | Fax 513 862 2861
        Tonya_Johannemann@trihealth.com
        Good Samaritan Hospital
        375 Dixmyth Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45220
        TriHealth.com | 513 862-1400
        [http://www.trihealth.com/images/logo-email-sig.png]
        [Magnet 100px]

      • Hi Tonya… The dormant fungi are present in soil, on plant vegetation, on mowing equipment, etc. When the temps and humidity are optimum and if there is a non-resistant plant the disease will occur. Some take the approach of planting resistant grass species/varieties. Others try to improve the conditions like not watering at night, improving air circulation and sunlight. Keeping the grass healthy is important so feeding regularly with slow release nutrition so too much surge growth is not created helps. The final solution is to put down a good systemic fungicide when the disease is first noticed. Some years you may be able to get by without treating.

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