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How to Treat Fire Ants Following Flooding

October 7, 2015

All the flooding pictures break my heart. Rita and I had to deal with a small (and I emphasize small) flood years ago and all the problems seemed big to us at the time, however nothing like folks are experiencing now. I am sure fire ants are not the most important thing, however a recent video from a South Carolina TV station shows how fire ants survive a flood.  (Video recorded by WSAV photojournalist Chris Murray shows what appears to be a floating island of fire ants on top of the water in Dorchester County, South Carolina.)

As rainwater dries and floodwaters recede, many residents will find displaced fire ant colonies popping up in backyards and even inside their homes.

Fire ant colonies build large nests in the ground, which can lead to visible mounds reaching one to two feet in height above ground. Fire ants typically are found in lawns and gardens, but occasionally, they can migrate into a home, driven by heavy rain or drought.

How to Treat Fire Ants

Step One – Treat the Mound:

Treat visible mounds with a granular product or a dust, such as Ortho® Orthene® Fire Ant Killer. This product is designed to kill the queen and entire colony, so use it wherever you see mounds..

Step Two – Protect the Ground:

Not all fire ant mounds are easily seen. Many remain hidden down in the grass. Fire ants also forage the yard for food and new nesting sites. Using a broadcast product like Ortho® MAX® Fire Ant Killer Broadcast Granules will protect your lawn by killing foraging fire ants and controlling new fire ant mounds from forming for up to six months.

Fire Ant mound in our neighborhood pops up after heavy rain.  Notice our red Georgia clay soil.

Fire Ant mound in our neighborhood pops up after heavy rain. Notice our red Georgia clay soil.

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